Insights + Resources

Can You Put Your IRA into a Trust?

Dec 2, 2019

Testament
What you should know about naming an IRA beneficiary.

Can your IRA be put directly into a trust? In short, no. Individual retirement accounts (IRAs) cannot be put directly into a trust. What you can do, however, is name a trust as the beneficiary of your IRA. The trust would inherit the IRA upon your passing, and your beneficiaries would then have access to the funds, according to the terms of the trust.

Can you control what happens to your IRA assets after your death? Yes. Whoever was named the beneficiary will inherit the IRA. But you also can name a trust as the IRA beneficiary. In other words, your chosen heir is a trust. When you have a trust in place, you control not only to whom your assets will be disbursed, but also how those assets will be paid out.

Using a trust involves a complex set of tax rules and regulations. Before moving forward with a trust, consider working with a professional who is familiar with the rules and regulations.

The Trust can Dictate the How, What, and When of Income Distribution.

A trust will allow you to specify an amount your heir may receive. Or, you could include language that requires your heir to take monthly or annual distributions. You can even stipulate what the money should be spent on and how it should be spent.

Why Would I Use a Trust Instead of a Will?

There are a couple reasons. The biggest is that a will always passes through probate. That means a court oversees the administration of your will and ensures that the bequeathed assets are correctly distributed. One thing to keep in mind, though, is that this may lead to an expensive, slower process. A living trust, on the other hand, can help certain assets avoid probate. This may save your estate and heirs both time and money. Finally, for those who would like to keep their arrangements discreet, a trust can remain private whereas a will is a matter of public record.

That Sounds Complicated.

If decisions about your IRA are complicated, it may be best to review your choices with a financial advisor who can explain the pros and cons of naming a beneficiary to your account.

Tags: ,

More Insights

Sep 25, 2020

To some, this may hardly feel like an economy headed for a bright future. But don’t tell that to home builders. Builder confidence in August jumped to an eye-popping 78 in August, according to the Housing Market Index courtesy of the National Association of Home Builders. To put that number in perspective, anything over 50 … Continue reading “Home Builders Confident in Economic Rebound”

Sep 23, 2020

When it comes to retirement, some women face obstacles that can make saving for retirement a challenge. Women typically earn less than their male counterparts and often take time out of the workforce to care for children or other family members. Added to the fact that women typically live longer than men, retirement money for … Continue reading “Women Facing and Conquering Retirement Challenges”

Sep 21, 2020

Football is back, which means Summer is coming to a close, days will get shorter, and sweaters will soon be in play. This year, there was no pre-season, so professional football started in September, which coincidentally, is a perennial month for stock market volatility.1

Sep 18, 2020

Roth IRA Conversion decisions have attracted retirement savers since their introduction in 1998. They offer the potential for tax-free retirement income, provided Internal Revenue Service rules are followed.

Sep 16, 2020

The 2015 Obergefell v. Hodges Supreme Court decision streamlined tax and estate strategizing for married LGBTQ+ couples. If you are filing a joint tax return for this year or thinking about updating estate strategies, here are some important things to remember.

Insights + Resources >