Insights + Resources

How to Buy I Bonds Direct From Treasury

May 20, 2022

US Capitol Building on Blue SkyWith inflation hovering near 40-year highs, some investors are looking for alternative ways to weather the storm. For many, a Series I Savings Bond is just the ticket. I Bonds give investors a rate of return plus inflation protection and are backed by the U.S. government.

I Bonds are pretty simple to set up. You can go to TreasuryDirect.gov and open a free account to purchase these federally-backed securities directly from the U.S. Treasury.1

Here’s how to get started.

Gather your info.

Make sure you have the following close at hand: your taxpayer identification number, current address, checking or savings account information, and email address.

Go to Treasurydirect.gov’s account creation page.

Navigate to the bottom of the page and select “Apply Now” on the left. This will begin your account creation journey. Next, you will choose between an Individual or Entity account. Select Individual account type (it’s the default option) and click “Submit.”

Enter your info.

Using the information gathered in step 1, fill in the fields requested and check the box at the bottom to certify your Taxpayer Identification Number. Click “Submit.”

Select a personalized image.

Take some time here to select an image and caption you will remember. Think of this as a visual password for your account. Click “Submit.”

Secure your account.

Select your password and security questions on this screen. Make sure the answers to your security questions are impossible to guess but easy to remember. Click “Submit” to move to the final step.

Check your email.

Finally, look for your TreasuryDirect account number in your email. You’ll need this to log into your account later.2

You can begin purchasing I Bonds now that you’ve created your account. Here are a few things to keep in mind. I Bonds earn interest for 30 years unless you cash them in. You can do this after a year has passed from the time of purchase, but you’ll lose the previous three months of interest. However, there is no penalty if you let them mature for five years or more. The maximum amount you can invest is $10,000 total per calendar year.3

Questions about I Bonds, or anything else financial? Feel free to reach out anytime.

For more insights and resources, be sure to sign up for our Weekly Market Commentary. Follow our YouTube channel where we regularly post our Epic Market Minute videos. Follow us on LinkedIn, or like us on Facebook. And as always, please don’t hesitate to reach out to a dedicated service professional at Epic Capital.

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