Insights + Resources

How US Savings Bonds Work

Aug 20, 2021

US Savings Bonds instead of Chinese products for Christmas - Home | FacebookDid you buy U.S. Savings Bonds decades ago? Or did your parents or grandparents purchase them for you? If they’re collecting dust in a drawer, you may want to take a look at them to see if any of your bonds have matured. If your bonds have matured, that means they are no longer earning interest, and it also means you may want to consider cashing them in.1

This article is for informational purposes only.

It’s not a replacement for real-life advice, so make sure to consult your tax professional when you’re considering any move with a U.S. Savings Bond.

You want to keep track of the maturity dates, the yields and the interest rates on your bonds, as that will help you to figure out what bond to redeem when. Fortunately, you’re able to check the maturity dates online now so it’s relatively easy to determine if it’s time to cash-in your bonds.2

Use savings bonds for educational purposes.

If you’ve been holding onto Series EE or Series I savings bonds, the interest paid is tax-exempt, so long as the money is used to pay for qualified educational expenses. There are other considerations, so if you discover you have these types of bonds to cash in a tax professional may be able to provide some guidance.3

Interest accumulated over the life of a U.S. Savings Bond must be reported on your 1040 form for the tax year in which you redeem the bond or it reaches final maturity. This must be done even if you (or the original bondholder) chose to have the interest on the bond accumulate tax-deferred until the final maturity date. Failure to report such interest may lead to a federal tax penalty.2

Remember, U.S. Savings Bonds are guaranteed by the federal government as to the payment of principal and interest. However, if you sell a savings bond prior to maturity, it could be worth more or less than the original price paid.

U.S. Savings Bonds are taxed in one of two ways.

Bondholders choose to defer the tax until the bond matures. Once they redeem the bond, they report the interest through a 1099-INT form. Some choose to pay the tax annually prior to cashing the bond in, reporting the increase in the value of the bond as taxable interest each year.2,3

What if you find out you have held a U.S. Savings Bond for too long?

Another note about reporting interest: if a U.S. Savings Bond has matured and you have failed to redeem it, you will not find a Form 1099-INT for it in your records. Only redemption will bring that 1099-INT your way. (The accumulated interest for the bond should have been reported to the IRS regardless.) After you cash in that old bond, you will thereafter receive a 1099-INT. It will record that the interest on the bond was earned in the year of the bond’s final maturity.2

Plan ahead & keep track.

U.S. Savings Bonds were issued on paper for decades and were often purchased on behalf of children and grandchildren. Now, U.S. Savings Bonds are issued electronically. While the interest on U.S. Savings Bonds is taxed by the IRS, it is exempt from state and local taxes.1,2

For more insights and resources, be sure to sign up for our Weekly Market Commentary. Follow our YouTube channel where we regularly post our Epic Market Minute videos. Follow us on LinkedIn, or like us on Facebook. And as always, please don’t hesitate to reach out to a dedicated service professional at Epic Capital.

Tags: , , , ,

More Insights

Sep 22, 2021

Healthcare can be one of the priciest yet essential parts of life’s journey. And yet, many struggle to utilize the financial tools that may help. Take Health Saving Account (HSAs), for example.

Sep 20, 2021

If you are feeling a bit confused about the direction of inflation, you’re in good company. Some of the best and brightest economists in the country are having a tough time getting their arms around the current inflation trends. The most recent Producer Price Index reading came in above economists’ estimates at a record level … Continue reading “The Best, the Brightest, and Inflation”

Sep 17, 2021

Want to give your child or grandchild a great financial start? A Roth IRA might be a choice to consider. There are many reasons why starting a Roth IRA for a teenager may be a sound financial strategy. Read on to learn more about how doing this may benefit both of you.

Sep 15, 2021

The bull market continues, with the S&P 500 Index now up seven months in a row. Stocks have impressively gained 20% year-to-date, with the S&P 500 making 53 new all-time highs before the end of August—another new record. All of this has happened with very little volatility, as the S&P 500 hasn’t had so much … Continue reading “The Bull Market Continues … For Now”

Sep 13, 2021

It can be incredibly difficult to make sense of data. A report coming from one body may tell you one thing, and another report might seem to offer a wholly different perspective.

Insights + Resources >