Insights + Resources

Insurance When You’re Newly Married

Nov 15, 2019

Car with a "Just Married" sign
Assess the coverage for your new household.

Marriage changes everything, including insurance needs. Newly married couples should consider a comprehensive review of their current, individual insurance coverage to determine if any changes are in order as well as consider new insurance coverage appropriate to their new life stage.

The good news is that married drivers may be eligible for lower rates than single drivers. Since most couples come into their marriage with two separate auto policies, you should review your existing policies and contact your respective insurance companies to obtain competitive quotes on a new, combined policy.

Home

Newly married couples may start out as renters, but they often look to own a home or condo as a first step in building a life together. The purchase of homeowners insurance or condo insurance is required by the lender. While these policies have important differences, they do share the same purpose – to protect your home, your personal property, and your assets against any personal liability.

You should take special care of what is covered under the policy, the types of covered perils, and the limits on the amount of covered losses. Pay particular attention to whether the policy insures for replacement costs (preferable) or actual cash value.

Health

Like auto insurance, couples often bring together two separate, individual health insurance plans. Newly married couples should review their health insurance plans’ costs and benefits and determine whether placing one spouse under the other spouse’s plan makes sense.

Disability

Married couples typically combine their financial resources and live accordingly. This means that your mortgage or car loan may be tied to the combined earnings of you and your spouse. The loss of one income, even for a short period of time, may make it difficult to continue making payments designed for two incomes. Disability insurance replaces lost income, so that you can continue to meet your living expenses.

Life

Central to any marriage is a concern for each other’s future well-being. In the event of a spouse’s death, a lifestyle based on two incomes may mean that the debt and cash flow obligations can’t be met by the surviving spouse’s single income. Saddling the surviving spouse with a financial burden can be avoided through the purchase of life insurance in an amount that pays off debts and/or replaces the deceased spouse’s income.

Liability

Personal liability risks can have a significant impact on the wealth you are beginning to build for your future together. Consider purchasing umbrella insurance under your homeowners policy to protect against the financial risk of personal liability.

Extended Care

Extended care insurance may be a low priority given other financial demands, such as saving for retirement. Nevertheless, you may want to have a conversation with your parents about how long-term care insurance may protect their financial security in retirement.

Tags: ,

More Insights

Jan 17, 2020

The Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement (SECURE) Act is now law. With it, comes some of the biggest changes to retirement savings law in recent years. While the new rules don’t appear to amount to a massive upheaval, the SECURE Act will require a change in strategy for many Americans. For others, it … Continue reading “The Secure Act”

Jan 15, 2020

For most, creating an estate strategy is important to make sure your loved ones are taken care of after you’re gone. But it may be just as important to have an estate strategy for your business. Whether you’re a sole proprietor who will be passing on your business to your heirs or your business partners … Continue reading “Buy Sell Agreements for Businesses”

Jan 13, 2020

Financially, many of us associate April with taxes – but we should also associate April with important IRA deadlines. April 1, 2020 is the deadline to take your Required Minimum Distribution (RMD) from certain individual retirement accounts. April 15, 2020 is the deadline for making annual contributions to a traditional IRA, Roth IRA, and certain … Continue reading “2019 IRA Deadlines Are Approaching”

Jan 10, 2020

  You may have seen this statistic before or one resembling it: the average 65-year-old retiring couple can now expect to pay more than $250,000 in healthcare costs during the rest of their lives. In fact, Fidelity Investments now projects this cost at $285,000. The effort to prepare for these potential expenses is changing the … Continue reading “Healthcare Costs are Cutting into Retirement Preparations”

Jan 8, 2020

If you ever have the inkling to manage your investments on your own, that inkling is worth reconsidering. Do-it-yourself investment management can be a bad idea for the retail investor for myriad reasons. Getting caught up in the moment.When you are watching your investments day to day, you can lose a sense of historical perspective. … Continue reading “Why DIY Investment Management Is Such a Risk”

Insights + Resources >