Insights + Resources

What Are Stock Splits?

Aug 24, 2020

Stock Splits Sign
Here’s what you need to know

Two high-profile companies—Apple and Tesla—have announced stock splits in the past few weeks, which makes it a great time to discuss what’s involved when a company announces a stock split.

Remember, any companies mentioned are for illustrative purposes only. It should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of the securities. Any investment should be consistent with your objectives, timeframe, and risk tolerance.

In an earlier video from Financial Advisor and Managing Director Ed Doughty, he touched base on how these stock splits have altered the market. To hear more thoughts as they come out, feel free to subscribe to your YouTube channel.

The Securities and Exchange Commission says, “Companies often split shares of their stock to try to make them more affordable to individual investors. Unlike an issuance of new shares, stock splits do not dilute the ownership interests of existing shareholders.”1

Apple Inc. announced that the 4-for-1 split of its common stock, and trading is expected to begin on a split-adjusted basis on August 31. Tesla Inc. plans a 5-for-1 split, which also is scheduled to begin trading on a split-adjusted basis on August 31.2,3

When a company declares a stock split, a shareholder’s total market value will remain the same. For example, say you own 100 shares of a company that trades at $200 per share. If the company declares a 2 for 1 stock split, you will own a total of 200 shares at $100 per share immediately after the split. If the company pays a dividend, your dividends paid per share will also fall proportionately.4

There are also “reverse stock splits.” If a company declares a reverse split, it plans to reduce the number of outstanding shares, such as a 1 for 2 split. Reverse stock splits tends to occur with companies that believe their stock price is too low to attract investors.5

Will more companies consider a stock split? That’s hard to say. Some companies prefer a higher stock price. Perhaps the best-known high-priced stock is Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway Inc. It’s Class A shares trade for more than $300,000 a share.6

In the days leading up to stock splits, you’re likely to hear a lot of opinions about the companies. Over the years, we have found that it’s best to ignore that chatter and stick with an investment approach that’s in line with your personal situation. Talk to a financial advisor today about your situation.

Tags: , ,

More Insights

Nov 27, 2020

Are prescription drug costs burdening your finances? Some people find it a challenge to manage the cost of prescription drugs. Americans pay an average of $1,200 per year for medicine. For those facing greater and more dangerous ailments, some drug costs are $10,000 per month or even lump sums in excess of $80,000 for certain … Continue reading “Managing Drug Costs”

Nov 23, 2020

As the United States sees a rise in cases of COVID-19 across the nation, news of two promising vaccines out of hundreds being tested has offered a ray of hope for a fatigued world.1

Nov 20, 2020

With the Federal Reserve keeping interest rates at or near zero, you may wonder about your mortgage. Is it a good time to refinance or even pay off the debt entirely? After all, your mortgage is one of the biggest expenses you may have in life, so why not rid yourself of that debt as … Continue reading “Interest Rates and Your Mortgage”

Nov 18, 2020

As an investor, it can be tempting to get caught up in daily news headlines. From election news to vaccine updates, these headlines can lead to additional volatility in the markets. Consider how news about the election and COVID-19 vaccines have moved the markets over the past several weeks. But having a financial strategy can … Continue reading “Speed Bumps and Vaccine Headlines”

Nov 16, 2020

Here’s a windfall scenario for you: You pick up what appears to be a lottery ticket. You check the numbers for a laugh and discover a winning combination, offering you millions of dollars in prize money. What are the chances of that?

Insights + Resources >