Insights + Resources

Creating an Investment Portfolio

Jun 9, 2023

You’ve identified your goals and done some basic research. You understand the difference between a stock and a bond. But how do you actually go about creating an investment portfolio? What specific investments are right for you? What resources are out there to help you with investment decisions? Do you need a financial professional to help you get started?

A good investment portfolio will spread your risk

It is an almost universally accepted concept that most portfolios should include a mix of investments, such as stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and other investment vehicles. A portfolio should also be balanced. That is, the portfolio should contain investments with varying levels and types of risk to help minimize the overall impact if one of the portfolio holdings declines significantly.

Many investors make the mistake of putting all their eggs in one basket. For example, if you invest in one stock, and that stock goes through the roof, a fortune can be made. On the other hand, that stock can lose all its value, resulting in a total loss of your investment. Spreading your investment over multiple asset classes should help reduce your risk of losing your entire investment. However, remember that there is no guarantee that any investment strategy will be successful and that all investing involves risk, including the possible loss of principal.

Asset allocation: How many eggs in which baskets?

Asset allocation is one of the first steps in creating a diversified investment portfolio. Asset allocation means deciding how your investment dollars should be allocated among broad investment classes, such as stocks, bonds, and cash alternatives. Rather than focusing on individual investments (such as which company’s stock to buy), asset allocation approaches diversification from a more general viewpoint. For example, what percentage of your portfolio should be in stocks? The underlying principle is that different classes of investments have shown different rates of return and levels of price volatility over time. Also, since different asset classes often respond differently to the same news, your stocks may go down while your bonds go up, or vice versa. Though neither diversification nor asset allocation can guarantee a profit or ensure against a potential loss, diversifying your investments over various asset classes can help you try to minimize volatility and maximize potential return.

So, how do you choose the mix that’s right for you? Countless resources are available to assist you, including interactive tools and sample allocation models. Most of these take into account a number of variables in suggesting an asset allocation strategy. Some of those factors are objective (e.g., your age, your financial resources, your time frame for investing, and your investment objectives). Others are more subjective, such as your tolerance for risk or your outlook on the economy. A financial professional can help you tailor an allocation mix to your needs.

More on diversification

Diversification isn’t limited to asset allocation, either. Even within an investment class, different investments may offer different levels of volatility and potential return. For example, with the stock portion of your portfolio, you might choose to balance higher-volatility stocks with those that have historically been more stable (though past performance is no guarantee of future results).

Because most mutual funds invest in dozens to hundreds of securities, including stocks, bonds, or other investment vehicles, purchasing shares in a mutual fund reduces your exposure to any one security. In addition to instant diversification, if the fund is actively managed, you get the benefit of a professional money manager making investment decisions on your behalf.

Note: Before investing in a mutual fund, carefully consider its investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses, which are outlined in the prospectus that is available from the fund. Obtain and read a fund’s prospectus carefully before investing.

Choose investments that match your tolerance for risk.

Your tolerance for risk is affected by several factors, including your objectives and goals, timeline(s) for using this money, life stage, personality, knowledge, other financial resources, and investment experience. You’ll want to choose a mix of investments that has the potential to provide the highest possible return at the level of risk you feel comfortable with on an ongoing basis.

For that reason, an investment professional will normally ask you questions so that he or she can gauge your risk tolerance and then tailor a portfolio to your risk profile. Keep an eye out for our next article where we go over the different types of investment professionals.

For more insights and resources, be sure to sign up for our Weekly Market Commentary. Follow our YouTube channel where we regularly post our Epic Market Minute videos. Follow us on LinkedIn, or like us on Facebook. And as always, please don’t hesitate to reach out to a dedicated service professional at Epic Capital.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

More Insights

May 20, 2024

Withdrawing taxable funds from a tax-deferred retirement account before age 59½ generally triggers a 10% federal income tax penalty, on top of any federal income taxes due. [Distributions from Section 457(b) plans are generally not subject to an early distribution penalty; and the penalty for distributions from SIMPLE IRA plans during your first two years … Continue reading “Exceptions to 10% Early Withdrawal Penalty”

May 20, 2024

In today’s corporate environment, cost cutting, restructuring, and downsizing are the norm, and many employers are offering their employees early retirement packages. But how do you know if the seemingly attractive offer you’ve received is a good one? By evaluating it carefully to make sure that the offer fits your needs.

May 17, 2024

Do bad money habits constrain your financial progress? Many people fall into the same financial behavior patterns, year after year. If you sometimes succumb to these financial tendencies, now is as good a time as any to alter your behavior.

May 15, 2024

You don’t want to pay more in federal income tax than you have to. With that in mind, here are five things to consider when it comes to keeping more of your income.

May 13, 2024

There’s a subjective uncertainty associated with financial wellness. Are you financially fit? And if so, how fit are you? While there is no clearly defined threshold for answering affirmatively, much less grading your level of fitness, there are baseline elements associated with financial fitness. To make sure that you’re on the right track, develop a … Continue reading “Basics of Financial Fitness”

Insights + Resources >